Last edited by Kigasho
Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of Capital absorptive capacity in developing countries found in the catalog.

Capital absorptive capacity in developing countries

Willy J. Stevens

Capital absorptive capacity in developing countries

by Willy J. Stevens

  • 146 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by A. W. Sijthoff in Leiden .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Developing countries.
    • Subjects:
    • Capital -- Developing countries.,
    • Absorptive capacity (Economics)

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 211-213.

      Statement[by] Willy J. Stevens. Foreword by J. H. Alder.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHC79.C3 S84 1971
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxvi, 215 p.
      Number of Pages215
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5708162M
      LC Control Number70173913

      Absorptive Capacity and Achieving the MDGs: The Case of Ethiopia1 1. Introduction Attention to aid effectiveness and absorptive capacity have gained increasing attention as efforts have grown to raise new and large-scale financial resources, beyond the Monterrey commitments, to help developing countries achieve the Millennium Development. We provide some evidence that even successful developing countries have limited absorptive capacity for foreign resources, either because their financial markets are underdeveloped, or because their economies are prone to overvaluation caused by rapid capital inflows.

      Since achieving independence, many developing have sought to promote economic development and change. To this end, they have been implement various industrial development policies and programs. Despite the implementation of these policies, however, there has been no significant improvement in the industrial performance of many developing countries.^ This study examines the extent to which weak Author: Stephen Zurigbo Onyeiwu. Key Terms in this Chapter. Spillover: The transmission of the advanced technology and knowledge from the foreign-owned company to domestic companies.. Absorptive capacity: The company’s ability to identify, assimilate, transform, and apply the external knowledge.. Foreign Direct Investment: The investment made by a company or entity based in one country, into a company or entity based in Author: Kijpokin Kasemsap.

        Innovation is widely seen as central to the growth of developing countries, and available evidence suggests that the returns to R&D investment should be extremely high. Yet low-income countries invest very little. This column suggests that this is due to the increasing scarcity of a wide array of factors complementary to innovation, and that this explains the lack of. Human capital based technology transfer is found significant and robust in both the OECD and developing countries. Absorptive capacity appears to be sensitive to the model specification and measurement of innovative activity as well as product eterian growth theory, R&D intensity, TFP growth, technology transfer, human capital Author: Md. Rabiul Islam.


Share this book
You might also like
Noorjahan ki zindigi 21 Sep 1926/ 23 Dec 2000.

Noorjahan ki zindigi 21 Sep 1926/ 23 Dec 2000.

effects of the storage temperature upon the physical and chemical properties of hens eggs.

effects of the storage temperature upon the physical and chemical properties of hens eggs.

boy made of meat

boy made of meat

Poems from the Rubio

Poems from the Rubio

new issue market and the finance of industry

new issue market and the finance of industry

Walking small

Walking small

Kwame Nkrumah

Kwame Nkrumah

We were there with Richard the Lionhearted in the Crusades

We were there with Richard the Lionhearted in the Crusades

Outlines of geography

Outlines of geography

Cadmium

Cadmium

philosophy of Henry George

philosophy of Henry George

A Sleepytime Book

A Sleepytime Book

Capital absorptive capacity in developing countries by Willy J. Stevens Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Stevens, Willy J. Capital absorptive capacity in developing countries. Leiden, A.W. Sijthoff, (OCoLC) firms in developing countries can build up absorptive capacity. As the literature on industrial districts in Italy has shown, (Gambarotto and Solari, ) intermediate organizations may play a fundamental role facilitating knowledge transfer between organizations with different levels of technological capabilities (and thus absorptive capacity).File Size: KB.

Capital absorptive capacity in developing countries [Willy J Stevens] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Intellectual capital and business performance: the role of dimensions of absorptive capacity Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Intellectual Capital ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print) November.

() but for developing countries only. Therefore, Blonigen and Wang () find schooling a significant absorptive capacity factor in the case of developing countries. However, schooling is found to be insignificant as an absorptive capacity factor in the case of developed countries. Li and Liu () also find evidence in support of File Size: KB.

Historically, the concept of absorptive capacity is rooted in macroeconomics, in which it refers to "the total amount of capital, or the amount of foreign capital, or the amount of foreign aid.

The growth of FDI inflow to developing countries is increasing, so have the questions of and absorptive capacity. ii DECLARATION I declare that this research project is my own work. It is submitted in partial fulfilment for the degree of Master of Business Administration at the Gordon institute of business capital needed to finance.

PROSPECTS FOR DEVELOPING ABSORPTIVE CAPACITY THROUGH INTERNAL INFORMATION PROVISION MICHAEL LENOX1* and ANDREW KING2 1 Fuqua School of Business, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A. 2 Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth University, Hanover, New Hampshire, U.S.A.

There is some preliminary evidence that foreign capital flows do not generate positive productivity spillovers to domestic firms for countries with relatively low absorptive capacities, but positive spillovers are more likely to be detected for countries with relatively high absorptive capacities (Aitken and Harrison, ; World Bank, gap.

Absorptive capacity is the ability necessary for the host country to absorb and adopt new incoming technology from a foreign country.

Technology gap is a distance between the host and source countries’ technology levels, which is exogenously given. Our model is thus an extension of Findlay’s by further endogenizing the role of Cited by: Abstract.

The role of heavy industry has been a subject of considerable controversy, both in practice 1 — see the Indian and Soviet debates — and in theory.

Neo-classical economists distinguish between projects rather than is to say their methodology tends to assume that no particular merit (or demerit) may be attached to a project because it is in a particular industry Cited by: 7.

In business administration, absorptive capacity has been defined as "a firm's ability to recognize the value of new information, assimilate it, and apply it to commercial ends".

It is studied on individual, group, firm, and national levels. Antecedents are prior-based knowledge (knowledge stocks and knowledge flows) and communication. One of the most popular lines of counter-argument is that developing countries do not even possess the necessary absorptive capacity to make effective use of larger international transfers of purchasing power.

Stevens: Capital Absorptive Capacity in Developing Countries, Leidenp. Cited by: 2. This paper deals with the determinants of absorptive capacity from foreign direct investment (FDI) spillovers.

We study how firm behavior, capabilities, and structure drive absorptive capacity such as research and development (R&D) activities and expenditures, R&D results, internal organization of innovation, external relationships of innovation, human-capital quality, family management Cited by: The efficiency of public investment depends crucially on how it is managed.

Countries with stronger public investment management institutions have more predictable, credible, efficient, and productive investments. Strengthening these institutions arrangements could close up to two-thirds of efficiency gap highlighted above.

The section also provides rankings of developing countries according to their level of absorptive capacity and implications for the levels of aid that they are currently receiving are discussed. Finally, Section 5 concludes by suggesting a number of possible responses to Cited by: Absorptive Capacity and Achieving the MDGs f 20 percent of GDP in recent years (Table ).

The real exchange rate has been relatively stable since the early s, under a “tightly managed. ration of new inputs and technologies in the production process: capital accumulation [8].

In developing countries, FDI could be a very important channel for the transfer of technology from developed countries [9]. For African countries, there has been a debate in the economics of development regarding the real.

Downloadable. Given the decline in growth momentum in the manufacturing sector in many OECD countries, the role of knowledge-based capital has emerged as a key driver for sustained growth.

While empirical studies on estimating knowledge spillovers have usually been undertaken at the country level, the spillover effects can be more definitive only if the analysis is conducted at the industry-level. Human capital based technology transfer is found significant and robust in both the OECD and developing countries.

Absorptive capacity appears to be sensitive to the model specification and measurement of innovative activity as well as product variety. Absorptive capacity is a firm’s ability to identify, assimilate, transform, and apply valuable external knowledge. Put another way, absorptive capacity is a limit to the rate or quantity of scientific or technological information that a firm can absorb.Knowledge Absorptive Capacity for Technological Innovation Capabilities: The Case of Korea: /ch This chapter presents the development stages of a theoretical model of Knowledge Absorptive Capacity (KAC) that shows how most, if not all, firms inCited by: 1.In addition, recent studies have also shown that the magnitude of spillovers also depends on the absorptive capacity of host countries.

In other words, spillover r Macmillan Publishers Ltd. Asian Business & Management Vol. 9, 4, – Absorptive capacity, FDI linked spillovers and economic growth in Vietnam.